Rookie Ship Design Project

Discussion in 'General' started by Kotori87, Mar 28, 2008.

  1. djranier

    djranier Well-Known Member

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    They are suppose to open one here in Orlando, but not sure when.
     
  2. webwookie

    webwookie Active Member

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    I originally created each drawing sheet in an application to which the dxf format is not a native file format so quirks such as these don't particularly surprise me. Many of the vendors to which I have normally needed to supply CAD data require it in a PMI-annotated 3D model (for those not familiar with the gradual shift of CAD data in that direction occuring in some industries, it's a 3D model that includes all of the "normal" 2D drawing data such as tolerences, datums, welding call-outs, and various notes directly embedded within the 3D model space) so 2D drawing sheets haven't been something I'm quite as well equipped to manage across formats.
    On the other hand, I'm glad you were able to sort out the dxfs.
     
  3. Droidling

    Droidling Member

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    My job is about half mechanical design. I work mostly in Inventor, so I am familar with 3D modeling. We still create individual 2D drawings of every fabricated part. That's mainly just for producing prototypes on manual machines.

    What are your native file formats. IGES and ProE files are supposed to work in Inventor. I have access to Solidworks if that helps. If we can find a file exchange format I might be able to help out.

    Terry
     
  4. webwookie

    webwookie Active Member

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    I work in Unigraphics so I can natively export 3D data into the parasolid (x_t) format without data loss/errors or not quite as natively into iges and step.
     
  5. Droidling

    Droidling Member

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    If you could upload, or email me an IGES file I'd like to check out how the conversion worked. I'd like to have a model of the hull to test fit some of the internal components.
     
  6. Kotori87

    Kotori87 Well-Known Member

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    The laser cutter at TechShop uses Coreldraw to print. I tried importing a DXF made by the emachineshop program, and it was... painful, to say the least. It took me two days (at $30 each) to get it to print properly, and then I ran into another difficulty. The laser cutter is great once you get it set up correctly, but you'd better plan to spend quite a while on the setup part.
     
  7. BoomerBoy17

    BoomerBoy17 Active Member

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    Any progress? i would like to see some pics of the Emily Bertin
     
  8. Cannonman

    Cannonman Ultimate Hero :P -->> C T D <<--

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    Sorry it's taken sooooo long to get the latest pics uploaded.. .. computer issues[:(!]


    OK, on to the goodies.....

    This is a shot of the sanded balsa bottom, via insperation from Mike's Bearn:

    [​IMG]

    The few ribs that don't have any between them yet were left empty for easier access while the running gear is installed, then they will get balsa blocks between them also.

    The multitude of clothes pins are holding on the outer portion of the deck. I strayed from the plans and cut a narrow margin from around the decks, then glued them to the ship. The plan was to help the decks fit, and locate better. It seems to be to my liking so far.

    Here is a shot with the decks installed. I'm planning on using imbedded magnets to hold the decks on.


    [​IMG]


    This is one of the latest pics. I am starting to layout the superstructure to see what looks right. I'm having a terribly difficult time interpreting the plans. It seems like the plans don't match any of the pictures I have found. I know that a lot of the superstructure was reworked around 1945, but even the earlier pictures don't really seem to match the plans so I'm cutting different profiles from the plans to see how they look compared to pictures. I know the top piece on the forward structure needs to be different. [:0]

    [​IMG]
     
  9. BoomerBoy17

    BoomerBoy17 Active Member

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    Sweet. It looks awesome. keep us updated!
     
  10. Cannonman

    Cannonman Ultimate Hero :P -->> C T D <<--

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    P.S.... I forgot to add..... I think all told, excluding design time on the superstructure, I have less than 8 total build hours into this so far!! I have a SoDak that I am also building. I am cutting all of the components manually on a scroll saw. In 8 hours, I managed to cut out 8 ribs, and a keel, and file all of the notches on them to fit one another. Long story short, the well designed laser cut Emile Bertin kit really, really speeds up the build process!! [:D] [8D] [:)]
     
  11. Gascan

    Gascan Active Member

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    I like how you made an inlaid deck to make it easier to put the decks in place. This is the favorite way of doing decks in the WWCC. In order to avoid cutting too much of a curve or the point of the bow, most ship-builders actually cut off the bow and stern, then set the fence on the bandsaw to cut off the side rails. The builder then glues the side rails, then the bow and stern. It can be held in place with magnets, tongues, flip levers, and sometimes even plain old-fashioned gravity. (have you paid off your gravity bill? You don't want them to cut your service in the middle of a battle)

    Visit this site
    Notice the light edge around the outside of the deck and the larger light sections at the bow and stern.
    Visit this site
    Notice the deck is the light part, and most of the bow has been removed from the rest of the deck and attached to the hull.
    Visit this site
    In this case, the change from removable deck to fixed bow is disguised with the candy cane aircraft identification markings.

    I haven't seen the Bertin since I handed it over to Neal, but I'll be seeing it tomorrow.
     
  12. Bryan

    Bryan Member

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    I would just like to say for all the future rookies and some of the rest of us out there who will at some time see these stunning plans and hopefully get to read a little part of this story ...


    THANK-YOU!!!

    Your work here has been nothing short of awesome!

    My son has fallen in love with it and would like it as his second
    boat after I finish his first for his birthday this november (Graf Spee).

    Then I finish my convoy boat and my Cruiser then .....YOURS, I like
    the shape also, maybe cutting out 2 is not any harder than one eh?.

    Thank-you again from both of us....
     
  13. webwookie

    webwookie Active Member

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    Back to business for a moment. I'm going to split the aft deck to make it more managable both for printing and building; does anybody have any suggested locations (in terms of rib number) where they think would be a good place to locate the joint(s)?

    Here's an updated screencap of what I have in mind so far:
    [​IMG]
     
  14. Droidling

    Droidling Member

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    I'm guessing this post has been hanging hear so long because it is dependent on the drive system and armaments. For a big gun first ship I assume it would have the 6 torpedo tube between the 2 cabins. so that section of deck would be separate. The accumulator would point aft so the pump could go under the forward lower cabin to keep it as close to the center of the ship as possible. CO2 tank in front of the Pump. The motor batteries and speed controller would go under the aft cabin. It would be nice to have the rear cabin and side decks come off as one piece. If possible all the rest of the superstructure up to the turrets, including the step would make up the next access cover would come off to to get at the gas bottle, valves, and pump.

    Kotori87 mentioned leaving a rim of deck for positive centering. What would you think about using the cut out center of the subdeck and gluing it on the bottom of the deck material instead?

    I probably have this all wrong. At least it's a starting place for discussion.

    Terry
     
  15. Kotori87

    Kotori87 Well-Known Member

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    Not just the drive system and armaments. It's also dependent on the size of wood that a laser cutter can handle. The places I know of, including www.customlasercutting.com and TechShop, can handle materials up to 18"x24". Anything bigger has to be done in multiple parts.
     
  16. Tugboat

    Tugboat Facilitator RCWC Staff Admiral (Supporter)

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    Do we have a rough guesstimate of the total cutting inches involved?
     
  17. Droidling

    Droidling Member

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    Most sheet metal shops have a laser cutter that would easily hold a full sheet of plywood. I have a contact with Westfab in Santa Clara. I'll check to see if they would be willing to run plywood parts.

    Pololu specializes in hobby robots. I'm sure they would be willing to do our parts. They take up to 45 x 35 sheets.
    http://www.pololu.com/catalog/product/749
     
  18. webwookie

    webwookie Active Member

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    It may just be my limited familiarity with that function of the software but it seems that I manage to crash the program[B)] every time I attempt to persuade it to tell me how many inches of cutting that a laser or waterjet would need to cut. In short, I can only say "quite a bit."

    I'm hoping to have a chance to work on the design some more this weekend; my employer is going through a growth spurt so the workload has been increasing (despite hiring nearly constantly ever since I started the new job).

    Main goals at this point from my end are as follows:
    1. Re-proportion parts so that as many as possible will fit on 8.5x11 or 8.5x14 sheets and re-publish in that format
    2. Incorporate refinements based upon feedback from everybody who's already been building one
    3. integrate mounting locations for electric motors/gearboxes once a brief list of suitable combinations of components has been determined that are readily available off-the-shelf.
     
  19. Droidling

    Droidling Member

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    I finally remembered to talk to my metal shop contact. They don't cut wood. He did recommend:

    San Jose Laser
    Visit this site
    408-494-0350

    When the new revision is done I can send in the drawings for a quote.
     
  20. Cannonman

    Cannonman Ultimate Hero :P -->> C T D <<--

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    It will take me a while to get it, but I can find out the number of laser cut inches we cut out on the initial run. As far as the deck split locations... ???? I think it is going to depend on the induvidual build as to where the best split is going to be, based on how the builder plans to arm the ship. A builder who is going to arm with torps will probably want the split in a different location as a guy who is arming with cannons .. possibly. There may be a happy compromise.