Ship Recovery

Discussion in 'General' started by Powder Monkey, Jul 2, 2008.

  1. BoomerBoy17

    BoomerBoy17 Active Member

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    I dont know what it is, but a floating superstructure just doesnt seem right to me, but if it saves you a ton of time and effort, why not?
     
  2. Powder Monkey

    Powder Monkey Active Member

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    [:0] Not me I will take my chances with my dual stakes redundancy and not giving up the looks of ship or sink and if both fail than I guess I was meant to swim [:D]
     
  3. Kotori87

    Kotori87 Well-Known Member

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    The bobber-in-smokestack, in its simplest form, only works in certain cases. However, with a little bit of design work it is quite possible to make your bobber-in-smokestack float take advantage of the escaping gasses trapped inside your sinking ship, to literally FORCE the bobber to deploy. Works like a charm, usually before your ship is more than a foot or two down, and in some cases it can POP the float out of its holder before the ship is even completely submerged.

    The basic idea behind recovery floats is this: either have a tremendous amount of buoyancy to pull your float up, or find a way to take advantage of the escaping gasses inside a sinking ship to force your float to deploy. Both of those ways are highly reliable. Anything else is iffy at best.
     
  4. BoomerBoy17

    BoomerBoy17 Active Member

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    Thats the idea monk, but u will be swimming alot, you should get sopme practice before i get a ship up and running [^]
     
  5. Powder Monkey

    Powder Monkey Active Member

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    NO LOOK AT THE PICTURE THE WHOL STACK IS THE FLOAT
     
  6. Powder Monkey

    Powder Monkey Active Member

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    DAM cap locks [:D]
     
  7. BoomerBoy17

    BoomerBoy17 Active Member

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    So, the entire stck floats? thats a neat idea. And yea, whats up with you and cap locks?
     
  8. Powder Monkey

    Powder Monkey Active Member

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    Looking fort some guidance on the rope I need something to lift my 14lb boat full of water to the surface. but small diameter, some sort of bionic rope [:p]
     
  9. BoomerBoy17

    BoomerBoy17 Active Member

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    why dont you use nylon? or 50lb fishing line?
     
  10. DarrenScott

    DarrenScott -->> C T D <<--

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    You really don't need to lift your boat clear of the water with the recovery line, If that was the case imagine the line you'd need to recover a Yamato or Montana! A line strong enough to bring the ship to the surface is all you need. After it's at the surface, grab hold of the wreck and drag it out.
     
  11. Powder Monkey

    Powder Monkey Active Member

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    Well common cense on that one but thanks if my IQ was 4 I would have needed that [;)] guess I should have worded that one a little better [:p]
     
  12. JohnmCA72

    JohnmCA72 Member

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    Or drag it to shore/shallow water where you can handle it more easily & safely. While it's submerged, you're really only lifting the weight of the hull itself. Once you break surface, add the weight of the water inside! Also, the water weight will often force open large holes in the hull, not just sprinkle out through all the little ones! That can make a "simple" patching job turn into a re-skinning (OTOH, if you were planning to do that anyway, the water may have saved you some work!).

    It really isn't all that obvious, & I'm sure that this has been a worthwhile thread.

    One more thing: Anchor points. I always create a "hard point" in the hull, usually in the area around where the shafts exit the hull, about 2/3 of the way back from the bow. The theory is that if the hull gets embedded in bottom muck, it's going to be easier to pull the stern free 1st than to pull from the bow where the drag of props & rudder may impede the effort. Besides resistance of props, etc. to mud is the potential to pull props off, bend rudder, break line, etc. while it's being dragged through muck.

    JM
     
  13. admiraljkb

    admiraljkb Member

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    Bingo. The trick on any recovery operation is to pull up SLOWLY until the ship gets close to the surface, and then put your hand under it to finish lifting it up, still slowly, unless you like seeing the water push your balsa off the side of the hull from the inside. :)
     
  14. BoomerBoy17

    BoomerBoy17 Active Member

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    I am not looking forward to the day my first ship sinks, but monk, was this topic formed because of your loss of the Baltimore, or because of the upcoming NATS?
     
  15. Powder Monkey

    Powder Monkey Active Member

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    well both the system i had didnt work so well and wanted a new one prior to NATS
     
  16. BoomerBoy17

    BoomerBoy17 Active Member

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    oh ok. Well, good luck getting a better system, hopefully you wont need it. but i still like the boober system, personally.
     
  17. Powder Monkey

    Powder Monkey Active Member

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    Well mine is sort of the bobber method only different
     
  18. BoomerBoy17

    BoomerBoy17 Active Member

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    i know, but was it attached to the superstructure, or can you push it over easily. if it cant deploy quickly, it may not deploy at all.
     
  19. JohnmCA72

    JohnmCA72 Member

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    That's a shame. You only get 1 "first time". Look forward to it, & enjoy it when it happens! I still remember mine fondly. The feeling that I had, in the moment when I realized that the ship was going to sink & I couldn't stop it, was almost like a near-death experience (I've had a few of those, too) but without any real personal risk. Once you've done it a few times, it gets to be routine, but the 1st time is priceless!

    JM
     
  20. djranier

    djranier Well-Known Member

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    Boomer, what is the boober system, sounds interesting. Is that dual inflatable devices on each side of the ship?