Show us your floats!

Discussion in 'Construction' started by NickMyers, Jun 6, 2009.

  1. Ubermelon

    Ubermelon Member

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    Jun 25, 2011
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    The first time I saw A video I thought the efd was just something that got blown off. When ever your ship sank you make a new one. But then I saw that blue heavenly iteam "tape".
     
  2. Kun2112

    Kun2112 Active Member

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    Apr 10, 2010
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    Here is the float on the Alsace:
    [​IMG]
    The super structure was made out of 1/8" 5 ply aircraft plywood for durability. As I already had a nice hollow space, I decided to use it for line storage. The float itself is balsa coated with epoxy. Since the boat weighs nearly 40 lbs without any water in it, it is a marker line only--not designed to haul up the ship. It hasn't sunk yet, but I want to try to fit in a class 7+ last man standing battle this year against a Montana and H-39. That Montana class has a LOT of internal volume.
     
  3. Tugboat

    Tugboat Facilitator RCWC Staff Admiral (Supporter)

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    I really like your using just the top of the SS as a float vice the whole thing. Nice clean looking SS, too.
     
  4. Kotori87

    Kotori87 Well-Known Member

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    Just a heads up, that tall float provides a lot of leverage when a round hits it. I have seen a Dunkerque with similar setup have its float shot off several times.
     
  5. Kun2112

    Kun2112 Active Member

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    Thanks, Clark. We do a lot of displays in the area, so I try to make my ships look as nice as practical for a combat boat to get more people to stop by and talk. IMHO if you have to scratch a super with lots of vertical lines and sharp angles and weight is not an issue, you can't beat plywood for looks and durability. I've heard stories about floats getting snagged, so the top of the boat seemed like the best place.
    Carl, I thought about that but figured that as high as it is, it shouldn't be an issue.
     
  6. Quintanius

    Quintanius Member

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    Jun 19, 2012
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    Obviously I have not tried this yet, but on the Nelson/Rodney build I drilled out holes in a tube (after painting it with yellow & black stripes so it look cooler) and secured that with screws to the structure. Below, passing though the hull, are 2 very large screws, big hunking flatheads with a metal plate I think. To this I'll attach a length of chain (for ballast and for recovery) and a length of that nice strong surveyor/construction line that is so very bright, and a very large bobber that fits loosly inside the hole. Probably have the bobber and the hatch somehow attached to each other, not sure how yet. Water in Alaska is amazingly chilly, and we have alot of silt here. And water is usually deep. Since then I realize that having the recovery line/chain at the stern end would probably be better, so as not to drag/damage the stern, rudders and props. Here is a pic - obviously, this build is still in progress.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    Thomas
     
  7. joe thomer

    joe thomer Active Member

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    there is picture of a spool of cord that is attached to the under side of the super strutures back in the thread. there is a clip on the end of the cord. this clip attaches to the hull. is there a eye let in the hull. meaning a hole drilled thru the hull with a nut/washer on the bottom of the boat and the eyelet inside the hull the clip bolts to?