Using internet resources to plan your build

Discussion in 'Construction' started by SteveT44, Sep 4, 2015.

  1. SteveT44

    SteveT44 Well-Known Member

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    Thought I'd share some techniques that I use to plan a warship build. These methods are for producing "semi-scale" models that are perfectly acceptable in warship combat.

    A primary tool I use in my planning is Coreldraw. Coreldraw is a very popular 2D vector drawing program that's been around since the 90's. Vector means that the lines are defined mathematically within the program and not by pixel counts. This is important because it allows precise scaling of lines and images within the program. Coreldraw is a commercial product but older versions can be found online (with install keys) with a little Googling. There's also a couple of open source (free) vector drawing programs out there.

    These methods are for figuring out the sizing and placement of decks and super structure in a fiberglass hull build. Basically, the method starts by finding a detailed drawing of your ship (and other handy source material) and importing it into the drawing program. Then using the deck length measurement from your hull molding, define a page size in the drawing program large enough for your "work surface". I then draw a box the length of the deck measurement (orange box in image). The ship drawing is then scaled to fit the box as shown.

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    As you can see in this overall screenshot, I've also imported images I found of an "un-boxing" review of an HMS Barham model. I little internet digging will easily find such reviews of almost any model kit ever made.
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    I've used this image to outline the first level superstructure using the box drawing tools of Corel. Angled items were boxes that were edited by adding and deleting points where required. I only outline half of what I want and then copy and mirror the elements to get a complete outline.

    [​IMG]



    Here, I've copied the above elements and overlaid and scaled them on the main drawing. Once "fitted" to the main drawing, the individual elements can then be printed out to standard size paper. Also note additional boxing, circles, and dimensioning for things like deck beam at the casemate cutout, and turret positioning and size.

    [​IMG]


    If your lucky, that un-boxing review of your boat will have shots of the part sprue's and assembly drawings. Most typical ship plans in my experience usually don't have a lot of detail when it comes to the superstructure and images such as these are gold when planning your build.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    That's it for now....
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2015
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  2. rcengr

    rcengr Vendor

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    Excellent overview! I also tend to use plastic model reviews and pictures to determine the placement of a lot of items. Even more interesting is if you can find a review of two kits from different manufacturers and commentary on why one is more scale than the other.
     
  3. Tugboat

    Tugboat Facilitator RCWC Staff Admiral (Supporter)

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    I have been using the free software GIMP (Gnu Image Manipulation Program) for the same purpose. Very helpful.
     
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