what type of

Discussion in 'Construction' started by Powder Monkey, Jan 18, 2007.

  1. Powder Monkey

    Powder Monkey Active Member

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    and its chowda get it right [;)]
     
  2. Tugboat

    Tugboat Facilitator RCWC Staff Admiral (Supporter)

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    LOL! Gneiss Guy LOVES chowdah! lol I was stationed in CT for many years & drove my cah to Bahs-ten a lot :)
     
  3. Powder Monkey

    Powder Monkey Active Member

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    was that the Sub base you drove ya cah from
     
  4. Powder Monkey

    Powder Monkey Active Member

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    Hey Justin I just left HOME CHEAPO was that a tan and white can of resin do you recall if so it was bondo I almost got it but figured I would check with you first
     
  5. JustinScott

    JustinScott Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, I seem to remember it being tan and white. I don't have any more of it & am not running to the store to find out. :) I think you would be safe with any fiberglass resin, honestly. I don't believe for a second that any 'glass resin would fall apart after getting wet... Just remember to let it dry first!

    jks
     
  6. Powder Monkey

    Powder Monkey Active Member

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    okay thanks yes it is a bit cold to go out now [;)] I was torn between bondo and Boat Yard Fiberglass Resin from ACE but you sold me on the deck story so its off to Home Cheapo in the AM thanks again
     
  7. JustinScott

    JustinScott Well-Known Member

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    Glad I can be of help! :)
     
  8. Powder Monkey

    Powder Monkey Active Member

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    The Bondo resin worked great but now I have a new rooki question how many layers of 2oz glass should I put down?
     
  9. JustinScott

    JustinScott Well-Known Member

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    Haha... Good to hear it! :)

    The stuff is a hard outer coat to your boat. I think 1 complete layer would be enough to make it waterproof. However, if you have extra time & material; I would glass it a couple of times for strength over time & to be sure it is completely covered.
     
  10. JustinScott

    JustinScott Well-Known Member

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    By the way, are you still having problems with that calendar? Or is it working OK for you?
     
  11. Powder Monkey

    Powder Monkey Active Member

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    it is working okay we just need stuff to put in it LOl thanks for your help
     
  12. Buddy

    Buddy Active Member

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    Hey guys
    Hey I HAVE BEEN BUILDING HULLS for years and have had both types wood and fiberglass. I have found for myself to be more rewarding to build the wood ones. I have been told that it is a lost art, i dont know about that but to take a set of plans and do all the measureing and refitting does take a large amount of time. I do like it in the end when you see the hull finally takeing shape. Now I do cut all the ribs from 1/4 plywood, I use the best I can get I like the 5 plywood from LoneStar, It is kiln dried and useally baby smooth.I use the same for the same for the subdeck. I like to use either the 1/64 3 ply wood for the sheeting up to the hard area. I use scraps from cutting out the ribs to make the stringers between the ribs to give a boundary for the hard area and this also gives the sheeting for the bottom something to attach to.I use leftovers also to build the solid areas for the bow and stern and then shape them down. Now I like to use the 6oz heavy fiberglass cloth that is sold at Walmart for the first layer of glass. After this has cured I then sand it to make sure it is smooth and fix what ever imperfections that happens. Then I take and use 2 oz cloth I get from my hobby shop and when it is done curing I sand it smoothe. I like to use Midwax with the Honey pine stain for doing the ribs and decks. It useally takes about 3 layers. First one let dry and then sand with medium grit sand paper and apply another coat, after this is dry sand with a fine grit, apply last coat and let dry. it gives a smooth finish and is water repellant and gives a nice hard poly shell that holds up for a long time. I have a ship that is at Barnstormer boats that was built this way and is not 16 yrs old.
     
  13. Craig

    Craig Active Member

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    Hey, I am curious, you've tried both methods of making a hull. Which would you perscribe to the first time builder? I am interested in the Montana. I would prefer to be able to build more than one hull of it and like accuracy and detail. I am at the moment leaning towards the fiber as it seems, although more hazardous to health, the easier route once you've gotten the "hard" work out of the way. Any advice would be very helpful. Thank-you.

    Craig
     
  14. Mark

    Mark Active Member

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    I'd have to go with wood for a couple of reasons: First off any of you seen a 1/8 scale hydro doing 50mph made out of fiberglass crash and survive well?? I haven't. The wood ones not only survive better but are also easier to repair. As for combat ships the wood has one up on the fiberglass ones do to more reinforcement. Since you fiberglass the outside of the hull and epoxy the inside we're not really compairing wood to fiberglass hulls, we're compairing fiberglass to wood reinforced fiberglass hulls. Looking at it this way wich one do you honestly think will last/survive longer for battling?
     
  15. CURT

    CURT Well-Known Member

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    The Fiberglass hull will survive longer.I have seen fiberglass hulls crash at high speed and they were repaired in no time.
     
  16. JustinScott

    JustinScott Well-Known Member

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    I have to agree with curt... with 'glass hulls if you break something you basically remake the part that broke. With wood, you have to remove/ replace any damaged wooden planks.

    Besides, why is your battleship moving @ 50mph?
     
  17. Kotori87

    Kotori87 Well-Known Member

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    Justin, Mark's battleship is moving @ 50mph because its riding in the back of his car on the way to the battle pond. Heck, my cruiser hits 65 when its goin for a ride :)

    Anyway, I have to say that wooden hulls, while not recommended for a first-time builder, are preferable to fiberglass. Every single wooden-hulled ship is unique, a special work of art that can never be duplicated. Fiberglass hulls in comparison are practically rolling off an assembly line, if you've seen one you've seen 'em all. Second, building a wooden hull says a lot about the person who built it. In general, the people with the expertise and patience to make a high-quality wooden hull also have the expertise and patience to make high-quality and reliable guts to go in that hull, and as such are very dangerous on the pond. Third, wooden hulls are in no way weaker than fiberglass. I've said this before and I'll say it again: there is at least one wooden-hulled battleship in my club that has actively campaigned for more years than I've been alive, and is still active today. My club the WWCC uses almost entirely wooden-hulled warships, from battleships on down to destroyers. Most of these ships have NO fiberglass whatsoever, and they are just as sturdy as the few fiberglass hulls in the club.
     
  18. The fuzzy one

    The fuzzy one Member

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    I'l jump in on the whole wood vs FG debate. I've never dealt with wooden hull only fibreglass, but I'm gonna take a wild guess and say that you use a fair bit of wood. I totally agree that a wooden hull would be unique, and if I had the time I'd build one. But fibreglass inch per inch is SO much stronger. If you made the ribs of a FG hull ship as thick as I *presume* the ones on a wooden hull to be, it'd be nigh on indestructible. Also probably impossible to cut. Just my thoughts, if I'm wrng ignore me. I hink most people in NABS do that on reflex by now.
     
  19. Mark

    Mark Active Member

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    Thanks Carl, to clairify the speed issue, I was using hydros as an example (this is the type of boats I used to and still do, build). Also, the rest of you I think missed the part where I said most wood boats get fiberglassed on the outside and epoxied on the inside (this is almost universal for all wood boats both RC and the real deal) so in a way you guys are agreing that wood is good:)
     
  20. JustinScott

    JustinScott Well-Known Member

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    >Fiberglass hulls in comparison are practically rolling off an assembly line, if you've seen one you've seen 'em all.

    I want to call issue with that carl!!!!!!!!!

    I have spend a great deal of time & money creating my own fiberglass hull from scratch. I would like to say its unique.


    >to clairify the speed issue,

    No need to clarify, I was just taking the piss out of you.